Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology

HSP3M

Grade: 11

 

 

Unit One: Self and Others

 

 

 

Developed By:  Neelu Walia, Julie Simon, Suzanne Sabat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

 

 

Title                                                                     Pages

1.  Unit Overview                                               3-4

2.  SAP                                                                5-8

3.  Lesson Overview                                           9-10

4.  Lesson One                                                    11-14

5.  Lesson Two/Three                                         14-18

6.  Lesson Four                                                   19-20

7.  Lesson Five                                                    21-24

8.  Lesson Six                                                      24-29

9.  Lesson Seven                                        29-35

10.  Lesson Eight                                                36-39

11. Culminating Activity                                   40-45

12.  Instructional Organizer                               46

13.  Appendix                                                      47-49

14.  Statement of Design                                    50-51

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit Overview:

 

            This unit on socialization and human behaviour aims to teach students about the world around them and how this affects their personalities. This is the first unit students will study in the course Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology. They will learn about the basic foundations of Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology in order to learn about themselves and others, including the “forces that influence and shape their behaviour”. This is necessary before they can go on to study other units within the course as it will give them a full understanding of the agents of socialization and prior knowledge needed so that students can delve into the following units: social structures and institutions, and social organization.

It is necessary that adolescents learn about the process of socialization and how this influences their behaviours. Gaining deeper insights into human actions will assist students in understanding how agents such as the family, peers, and schools, shape an individuals personal beliefs and values.

The unit incorporates the ‘Self and Others’, and ‘Research and Inquiry Skills’ strands of the course curriculum.  For the culminating activity students will research a particular agent of socialization and two psychology theorists’. Students will be required to examine the effects the particular agent of socialization has on the lives of teenagers and present the theorists’ points of view on the subject.  The presentation will take place in the form of a “talk show”. 

Each of the four group members will assume one of the following roles: media anchor (host), theorist, and adolescent expert. Each student will also complete a position paper. The teacher will offer a variety of perspectives, a knowledge base to work from, and teach the necessary skills for students to

successfully complete the unit and excel at the assignment.

 


 

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT PLAN (SAP) TEMPLATE

 

COURSE TITLE & CODE: HSP3M Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology

 

GRADE: Grade 11

 

DESTINATION: University/ College Preparation

 

ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS (3-5)


1. Describe some differences and similarities in the approaches taken by anthropology, psychology, and sociology to the concept of self in relation to others.

 

2. Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others made by at least one of the leading practitioners in each of anthropology, psychology and sociology.

 

3. Analyse the role of the mass media in influencing individual and group behaviour

 

4.. Identify primary and secondary agents of socialization (e.g. family, school, peers) and evaluate their influence

 

5. Explain the role of socialization in the development of the individual


                                               


 

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT TASKS (7-10 maximum - list in anticipated order**)

Unit # & Title

Name/title of task

Brief description of task (what type? ind.vs group? content?)

Enduring Understanding Being Addressed

List Types of Formative Assessments or Scaffolding Required

Self and Others (Unit One)

 

 

 

 

 

Introductory Lesson:

 

Agents of Socialization and Human Behavior

-Individual Personality self – test

-Individual completion of socialization chart

 

-Group/Pair discussion

 

-         Class discussion to follow where culminating activity will be shared (application)

Identify primary and secondary agents of socialization (#4)

 

Explain the role of socialization in the development of the individual  (#5)

 

Describe the approach taken by sociology (#1)

Self Test

 

Class Discussion

(anecdotal notes made by teacher)

Self and Others

(Unit One)

 

 

Nature vs. Nurture

Individual Work:

-identify and assess the major influences that contribute to an individual’s personal and social development

-Define terms related to the topic (content)

-Explain the role of socialization in the development of the individual

-Develop an understanding of various theories on socialization

(content)

Identify primary and secondary agents of socialization and evaluate their influence (#4)

 

Explain the role of socialization in the development of the individual (#5)

 

Describe some differences and similarities in the approaches taken by anthropology, psychology and sociology to the concept of self in relation to others (#1)

Take a position line in the classroom (Nature or Nurture?)

 

Brainstorming chart in notebook

 

Video with questions and follow up classroom discussion

 

(anecdotal records taken by teacher)

Self and Others

(Unit One)

 

 

 

 

Jean Piaget and Cognitive Development Theory

Individual Work:

 -Research and record key ideas of theory (content)

 

Group Work:

-Communicate Results of findings (application)

Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others made by at least one of leading practitioners in each of anthropology, psychology and sociology (#2)

Teacher observation of groups (jigsaw groupings)

 

Assessment of student notes/ charts

 

quiz

Self and Others

 

(Unit One)

 

 

 

 

Gender Roles and the Media/

(Part One)

 

Classical Conditioning and the Media

(Part Two)

(Part One) Group Work:

-Share ideas (round table activity / no speaking)

 

-Follow up class discussion on findings

 

-Class activity with newspaper/ magazine photos (application) to observe gender roles

 

(Part Two):

 

Group Work:

Classroom Discussion on Classical Conditioning

 

Pairs:

Analyze a case study of Classical Conditioning

 

Follow up class discussion

 

 

 

Analyze the role of the mass media in influencing individual and group behavior (#3)

Anecdotal recording kept during classroom/ group discussions

 

Individual student conferences

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anecdotal recording kept during classroom/ pair discussions

 

Individual Student conferences

Self and Others

(Unit One)

 

 

 

 

Abraham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Group Work:

 

Class is divided in groups of 4 (classification activity/ human activities)

 

Pairs:

 

Work on a list of behaviors and explain the needs being met

Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others made by at least one of the leading practitioners in each of anthropology, psychology and sociology (#2)

Student Conferencing

Self and Others

(Unit One)

 

 

 

 

William Glasser Theory of Needs and “Total Behavior”

Individual:

Compare/Contrast Activity

 

Pairs:

Analyze case study

 

Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others by at least one of the leading practitioners in each of anthropology, psychology, and sociology (#2)

 

 

Student Conferencing

 

Anecdotal comments recorded during pair discussions

 

Case studies

Self and Others

(Unit One)

 

 

 

 

Sigmund Freud, Karen Horney and Personality Theories

Pairs:

 

Compare/ Contrast Freud and Horney’s theories

 

Analyze Case Studies

Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others made by at least one of the leading practitioners in each of anthropology, psychology and sociology (#2)

Student Conferencing

 

Feedback during group work

 

Case studies

 

Homework

 

Self and Others

(Unit One)

 

 

 

Culminating Task for Unit!

Group Presentation:

Interview

 

Individual:

 

Written Report

Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others made by at least one of the leading practioners in each of anthropology, psychology and sociology (#2)

 

Identify primary and secondary agents of socialization and evaluate their influence (#4)

 

Explain the role of socialization in the development of the individual (#5)

Oral Presentation

 

Individual Written Report

 

(30% of final grade)

            ** Be sure to identify which is/are the course culminating assessment tools (worth 30%)


 

 

 

 

 

 

LESSONS

 

Title: Socialization and Human Behaviour

Grade: 11 University/College Preparation

Strand: Unit One: Self and Others

Time: 60 minutes, 1 period

 

Lesson Title: Introductory Lesson: Agents of Socialization and Personality

Description: This introductory lesson will introduce the concept of socialization from a sociological perspective.  The lesson hook will include a personality self test which will assist students to gain insight into themselves and their behaviours.  Once they tally their results, they will determine whether they are an introvert or an extrovert and work in groups.  Shortly after, they will be asked to reflect on the factors that might influence their particular behaviour; this will be followed up with a brief socratic lesson on the definition of socialization and its primary and secondary agents with reference to a secondary source “Agents of Socialization”.  The lesson will conclude with the introduction of the culminating performance activity which will be thoroughly explained to the class.

 

Learning Expectations: Enduring understandings: #1, 4, 5

 

Overall Expectations:

Self and Others

SO1.02  evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of the self in relation to others made by at least one of the leading practitioners in each of anthropology, (Franz Boas, Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict), psychology (Sigmund Freud, Jean Piaget, Karen Horney), and sociology (George Herbert Mead, Irving Goffman).

S02.01  identify and assess the major influences that contribute to an individual’s personal and social development (e.g. heredity, environment, race, gender)

S02.02  Forces that Influence and Shape Behaviour-  analyse the role of the mass media in influencing individual and group behaviour

S03.01  explain the role of socialization of the individual

S03.03  demonstrate an understanding of anthropological, psychological, and sociological theories that deal with socialization (e.g. enculturation, nature versus nurture, social isolation).

 

Research and Inquiry

IS1.02  Define the concepts that are central to anthropology (e.g. evolution, diffusion, culture), psychology (e.g. perception, cognition, personality), and sociology (e.g. role, gender, institution);

ISI.03  demonstrate an understanding of the factors that explain human behaviour from the perspective of anthropology (myth, kinship), psychology (conditioning, subconscious), and sociology (socialization, social interaction);

IS2.04  demonstrate an ability to locate and select relevant information from a variety of print and electronic sources (books, periodicals, television, Internet sites, CD-ROMs);

IS2.06  demonstrate and ability to organize, interpret and analyze information from a variety of sources

IS3. 01  record information and key ideas from their research and document sources accurately, using correct forms of citation (those recommended by the American Psychological Association);

IS3.02  effectively communicate the results of their inquiries, using a variety of methods and forms (graphs, charts, diagrams, lab reports, oral presentations, written reports, essays, newspaper-style articles, video presentations).

 

 

Specific Expectations:

·        Demonstrate an understanding of the factors that explain human behaviour from the perspective of sociology

·        Identify the primary and secondary agents of socialization (i.e. family, school. Peers, media, work) and evaluate their influence on their own lives.

·        Identify and assess how personality many be influenced by agents of socialization

·        Understand the role of socialization in the development of the individual

·        Demonstrate an understanding of anthropological, psychological and sociological theories that deal with socialization.

 

 

Lesson One: Agents of Socialization and Personality

Instructional Strategies:

 

A personality test will be placed face down on each student’s desk prior to the

beginning of class. When all students are seated it will be explained that they are being given an “Assess Your Own Personality” self-test.  This will assist them to gain further insight into themselves and their behaviours, as it is important that

they learn about their own personality traits. The class will be instructed to turn over their papers, read the instructions and then proceed to write the test.

 

2. Once everyone has completed the test they will be asked to tally their scores according to the instructions on the test. After calculating their results students will be able to form their own groups of three and share their results. By assembling their own groups students should feel more comfortable sharing personal information.  The test determines whether a person is more of an extrovert (enjoys being in social situations) or an introvert (prefer to be alone). The aim is for students to consider what factors might influence these preferences/personality characteristics. In order to this the groups will be asked to discuss the following questions (these will be written on the board):

 

Do the findings of this self-test match your own prior beliefs about your

     personality?

Do the results match how others see you?

     (i.e. group members)

     How valid do you think such self-tests may be?

 

3.  The teacher will ask the entire class to consider what factors might influence

this type of behaviour. Why would a person be an introvert or an extrovert?  

Students will answer that biological and environmental forces have an effect  

(nature and nurture). They will be asked to list which environmental forces (or socialization agents) they believe influence how outgoing an individual is. As the students respond, answers will be written on the blackboard. 

The class will also be told that nature vs. nurture will be discussed in greater detail on the following day’s lesson).

 

 

 

 

4.  The  teacher will then introduce and define socialization:

Individuals learn to think and act in certain ways through social contact, and this type of learning is called socialization by sociologists. Socialization allows members of society to learn the accepted ways of behaving within a specific culture.

The article: What is Socialization? Will be passed out so that students will follow along as the teacher reads it to the class.

 

 

5.  The teacher will then discuss the primary agent of socialization: the family, and the secondary agents: peers, school, and work.  The completed socialization agents chart will be distributed to the class.  After reading the chart, students will be asked to reflect on how these agents have impacted their own lives. They are then to fill in the blank chart on the hand.

 

 

 

6.  Students will share their responses with the class and discuss.

 

 

7.  Have students individually read the article ‘Agents of Socialization’

 

 

 Students will be given some class time to begin answering the question sheet and will be instructed to complete the assignment for homework. By having students start on the homework in class, it will help them to remember they have homework and make it easier to complete as they will have had the opportunity to ask the teacher for any clarification.

 

 

 

9.  The culminating performance activity sheet will be distributed and will be

thoroughly explained to the class. Students will have a chance to ask questions and will be encouraged to begin preliminary research on possible theorists they may be interested in, as they will be forming groups and finalizing their topics in two days time.

 

Accommodations/Modification:

 

ESL students who do not feel comfortable sharing their personality test results in a group may pair up with someone from the same language group.

Students with special learning needs (i.e. reading or writing) will be given extra time to work on the assignment.

 

Resources:

“Assess your own personality” self-test from textbook: Our Social World

Article: What is Socialization?

Chart: Socialization Agents (once completed and a blank to be completed)

Article: Agents of Socialization

Question sheet on article

 

Assessment/Evaluation:

As students share and discuss the self-test the teacher will observe and listen to group answers.  Student contribution in the class discussion will also be assessed and feedback will be provided.  The homework questions will be collected the following day and marked for completeness.

 

 

Lesson Two/Three: Nature vs Nurture: The effect on human development and language acquisition.

Time: 120 minutes or 2 periods

Learning Expectations: Enduring understandings #1, 4, 5

 

Specific Expectations:

·       Identify and assess the major influences that contribute to an individual’s personal and social development (heredity and environment)

·       Define terms and concepts related to topic

·       Explain the role of socialization in the development of the individual

·       Demonstrate an understanding of anthropological, psychological and sociological theories that deal with socialization (nature vs nurture, social isolation.)

    

 

 

 

 

 

        Instructional Strategies   

 This lesson is designed for students to determine the  influences of biological and  environmental and biological factors that have influenced the formation of the Self.  Students will gain a deep understanding through a  cooperative learning experience followed up with a teacher moderated discussion on the influences of

 the media and friends on personality traits.  The lessons conclude with the film entitled “Secret of the Wild Child” which profiles Genie’s problems adapting to society after a period of isolation.

 

 

 

1.    Students will be asked to silently form a single diagonal line across the room according to what they believe influences a persons behaviour greatly: nature or nurture. Those believing most strongly in nature will line up in the far right corner of the room and nurture supporters in the far left. Those who believe equally in both will be in the middle. Once the line is formed students will have an opportunity to look around and decide if they are in the right spot. Once this is complete, students will pair up with a partner with an opposing point of view. Pairs will have one minute to explain to one another why they support a certain view. Students will then have an opportunity to create another line but they may change positions if they have been swayed by their partner’s arguments.

 

2.  The teacher will explain the difference between nature: inherited characteristics and nurture: learned, environmental forces.  Definitions of key concepts will be outlined to the class, as students will need to understand these for the class discussion, the work to be done in pairs. This will be presented to the class on an overhead and the teacher will explain each term and offer opportunities for students to ask any questions.

 

3.   The teacher will use the example of identical twins separated at birth to point out examples of what types of biological and environmental characteristics shaped them as persons. The example given will be of twins from the textbook. A chart will be drawn on the board to illustrate the similarities and differences and which would be attributed to heredity and environment so students can clearly identify these.

 

 

 

4.  Students will be given a few minutes to think to themselves about where they got some of own their personality traits. They will then be instructed to pair up with the person beside them and share their answers.

 

 

5.    Students will be required to brainstorm individually to examine what traits they possess that believe are genetic, and those that were influenced by the environment around them.  They will be asked to crate a chart in their notebooks and categorize their answers under the appropriate heading.  The teacher will model her own example on the board.

 

                  Traits attributed to Nurture

Friends                                              Media

-music                                             -fashion style

 

 

 

 

 

Students will determine if a trait they have inherited from a parent can be attributed to nature or nurture (do their siblings or cousins have the same trait?) They will have to consider if they believe any traits are unique to certain members of the family, and if other aspects of their personality have been influenced by different sources i.e. friends, teachers or television. At the end of the activity students will have an opportunity to share some of their answers with the class as a whole and ask any questions.

 

6. The Genie video “secret of the wild child” will be shown. The video profiles ‘Genie’s’ problems in language acquisition and socialization as she discovers the world, and the controversial efforts by scientists to examine her condition.

 

 

7.    During the video students will be responsible for answering the following questions:

1.    Why was the girl named ‘Genie’ by researchers?

2.    Why was the term forbidden experiment used?

3.    What were some of the similarities and differences between Genie and Marc Itard’s “Wild Boy of Averyon” (Victor)?

4.    What evidence suggested that Genie missed her time period for acquiring language?

5.    What evidence suggests that she may have been suffering from brain damage?

6.    Do you think that Genie was exploited in the name of science or were the researchers genuinely concerned for her welfare?

 

8.  After the video there will be a group discussion on the video during which time the answers will be taken up and students will have an opportunity to ask questions and voice their opinions. 

 

9. Groups for the culminating activity will be formed and topics will be finalized. One person from each group will submit the names of the group members and the focus of the presentation. The teacher will sign the submission for approval before the end of class. Any groups who have chosen the exact same agent of socialization and theorist will have to draw straws (and be prepared to have a second choice).  

 

Resources:

Overhead sheet with terms and definitions

1994 Video by Nova “Secret of the Wild Child” (the Genie story)

Text: Our Social World

 

 

Assessment/Evaluation:

The teacher will walk around the class to listen and observe the student’s responses and discussions and look over their charts to make sure they are on the right track.  A surprise quiz on the video will be given the next day (as the video’s content and class discussion should still be fresh in their minds) to ensure the questions were answered in class.

 

            TERMS FOR THE NATURE –NURTURE DEBATE

 

·        Nature –nurture debate:  The debate over whether nature (inherited,

                                             biological characteristics) or nurture (learned, 

                                             environmental forces) has more of an impact on

                                             personal development.

 

* Genes:                         Biological building blocks that determine a

                                             person’s hair colour, eye colour, height, and

                                             other physical characteristics

 

* Identical Twins                   Twins who inherit identical genes

 

*Fraternal  Twins                   Twins who have half their genes in common

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Four: Jean Piaget and Cognitive Development

Time: 60 minutes or one period

Learning Expectations: Enduring understanding #2

 

Specific Expectations:

·       Demonstrate an understanding of the stages of cognitive development by Piaget

·       Record information and key ideas from research

·       Effectively communicate the results of their inquiries to other group members

 

Instructional Strategies

Students will study the theories of Piaget’s cognitive development in jigsaw groups; here they will be given the opportunity to “master” a particular stage in development, make notes and return to their home groups to report their findings.  Teacher will be monitoring all groups and participate in some group discussion.

 

1.  Class will write a quiz on the Genie video from the previous day’s lesson. (If there is enough time the fill in the blank and multiple choice questions will be peer marked)

 

2.  Students will be asked to form groups of four. They will be told to number themselves from 1-4. These will be their home groups.

 

3.  Jigsaw groups will be assembled. All number ones will go to a table marked one in which there will be information on the sensorimotor stage of development. Table two will have info on the pre-operational stage, table three will study the concrete operational stage, and the number fours will deal with the formal operational stage.

 

These groups will be termed the “expert” groups. It will be explained that students are to be become experts in the field on the stage they are learning. They are to read the info and discuss the material. Students will be expected to make notes on the main points/ideas and teach them to members in the home group. All experts are to have similar notes.

 

4.  Students will return to their home groups and each will present their “expert” findings. The order will be 1-4 and those learning the material will be instructed to create a development chart and fill it in.

 

 

 

5.  There will be a debriefing session during which students will be asked if they enjoyed the activity and found worthwhile as a learning tool. This will also be an opportunity for students to raise any questions or clarifications on Piaget’s cognitive development.

 

6. For homework  Erik Erikson will be assigned from the textbook.

 

Resources

Quiz on Genie Video

Stages of Cognitive Development

Wwwed.sturt.flinders.edu.au/dlt/2000/piaget/stages.htm

 

Assessment/Evaluation

The teacher will observe the home and expert groups to ensure each student is participating as well as monitor the class discussion.  Student notes and charts on the stages of development will be in the form of a formative assessment.

 

Accommodations/Modifications

Students with learning disabilities will be given as much time as is needed to write the quiz.


 

 

 

Lesson Five: Gender Roles and the Media Part One; Classical Conditioning and the Media Part Two

Time: 120 minutes or two periods

Learning Expectations: Enduring understanding #3

Specific Expectations:

·       Analyze the role of the mass media in influencing individual and group behaviour

·       Identify the secondary agents of socialization (e.g. media) and evaluate their significance

·       Evaluate the role of cultural influences in socialization (e.g. as they affect gender expectations).

·       Conduct primary research through the gathering and analyzing of written and televised media

·       Effectively communicate results of inquiries using a variety of methods and forms (visual presentation of data).

 

Instructional Strategies

This lesson will allow students to work with their groups for the culminating activity as teams in a round table discussion on gender roles in the media.  Here, students will learn to formulate a hypothesis after reviewing newspapers and magazines that depict different gender roles; they are given the opportunity to test their hypothesis through observation and discussion with other group members.  Once each group shares their photos, they will be lead, by the teacher, into a class discussion around various stereotypes found in the media. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Divide the class into 7 groups (try to have culminating activity groups work as teams even if that means that you will need to add/subtract a newspaper/magazine.  This will strengthen the groups’ cohesiveness and communication) . Each group is to be given chart paper and a marker.  Groups are share their findings from last day’s homework assignment on gender roles in televised sitcom programs.  they are to share their findings in a “round table” (chart paper and pen go around the table, each student contributes one thought at a time.  There is no speaking allowed during the exercise.).  

 

1.     

In a class discussion, have groups share their findings.  Tell students that they are about to investigate the portrayal of gender roles in the written media.  Ask the class what do they hypothesise they are to discover with regards to gender roles? Would men and women be equally represented?

 

Give each group chart paper, scotch tape, scissors and two copies of written media to be investigated (Toronto Sun, Toronto Star, Globe and Mail, National Post, Metro, Teen Magazines).  Students are to cut out all the photos of the people they find in their newspaper/magazine (2 copies are given so that photos on both sides of a page can be used). 

Photos are to be taped onto the chart paper in 3 clusters: photos of men only, photos of women only, mixed photos.  Photos of visible minorities are to be visibly separated within a cluster.  

Stress to students the “hows” of visual presentation.  Explain the importance of using titles, large font, white space and logical organisation of the presented material (for example, presenting the clusters in an increasing order of photo frequency etc…).  Remind students that in their culminating activity they are expected to use a visual aid in an effective way.

 

2.

Have students cut out and organise their photos on the chart paper.  Walk between the groups, providing additional input and feedback on their visual presentation. Once finished, groups are to hang their work on the classroom wall.

 

3.

Students are to walk around the classroom, observing all of the newspaper/magazine photos hanged on the walls.  Ask students to take mental notes on whether the portrayed evidence supports their hypothesis.

 

4.

Each group is to share its finding in a round “table procedure”.

 

5.

 

Lead a group discussion with regards to the groups’ findings. 

§       Are men and women equally represented in the written media?

§       In mixed photos, are men and women portrayed as equals, or is one gender portrayed as more dominant?

§       How does this data compare to the sitcom observation on gender relations?

§       Are there differences between newspapers and teen magazines?

 

§       Do the photo portray a representative cross section of the population in terms of gender, physical appearance, socio-economic status?

§       Are visible minorities equitably represented in the newspapers/magazines?

 

§       How would these images are likely to effect readers?  Do they enforce stereotypes?

§       How would they effect a young reader?

 

6.

Summarise the lesson objectives and findings.  Tell the students that the next day will deal with how people learn through classical conditioning and how it is used in advertisement.

 

Lesson Six: Classical Conditionining and the Media

 

Time: 60 minutes or one period

Learning Expectations: Enduring understanding #3

 

Specific Expectations

 

1.          Identify and assess the major influences that contribute to an individual’s personal and social development.

2.          Analyze the role of the mass media in influencing individual and group behavior.

3.          Formulate appropriate questions for research and inquiry relating to one or more of the main areas of concern in the social sciences (i.e. Social Science).

4.          Demonstrate an ability to interpret, and analyse information gathered from a variety of sources (i.e. magazine advertisement).

Instructional Strategies

 

1.

To introduce the idea of classical conditioning and to elicit student interest, as soon as the class will settle down give the following instructions:

       “Please clear your desks, take out a piece of paper and a pen.

Following my dictation of the questions, you have five minutes to respond:

1.  How did you feel when I asked you to take out a paper and pen?

   2. Why did you feel this way?”

       

        Ask students to share their experience with the class.  Explain to the students that this anxiety provoking exercise is an example of classical conditioning.  The sentence: “Please clear your desks, take out a piece of paper and a pen”, elicits an automatic response of anxiety, which is based on past experience (learning).

 

2.     

Explain Classical Conditioning using Pavlov’s salivating dogs . While describing the experiment explain and use terminology:

Unconditioned Stimulus (UCS)/Unconditioned Response (UCR),

Conditioned Stimulus (CS), Conditioned Response (CR) and Trial.

 

3.

Using the exercise that opened the lesson (pseudo pop quiz), ask students what was the Unconditioned Stimulus, Unconditioned Response, Conditioned Stimulus, Conditioned Response. 

UCS – pop quiz.

CR -   fear, anxiety.

CS -   The instruction “Please clears your desks, take …”

CR – fear, anxiety in anticipation for a pop quiz. 

 

 

 

 

4.     

Divide the class into pairs.  Groups will independently analyze a case study of classical conditioning . Walk in between groups, to see how students are analyzing the problem, and take up the examples on the board.  

 

 

 

5.     

Tell students that classical conditioning is heavily used in advertisements found in the printed media and television.  Show the class an overhead with the

“Marlboro Man” (see appendix) and analyze it with the class using the following question sequence.

 

Question Sequence:

·       What do you see in this picture? Outline its components? (Knowledge)

·       What is this ad for?                                                    (Knowledge)       

·       Is the man actually smoking a cigarette?                   (Knowledge)

·       Who is this man?                                                        (Knowledge)

·       What is this man doing?                                            (Knowledge)        

·       Why did the marketing agency choose to have him tie his gloves with his teeth, eyes not showing? What image are they trying to portray? (Comprehension)

·       The ad is pairing Marlboro cigarettes with an image of a tough man so that smokers would feel a sense of confidence when they smoke.  (Application)

What is the:

      Unconditioned Stimulus? (Cowboy poster)

      Unconditioned Response? (Thinking/feeling tough, macho)

          Conditioned Stimulus? (Seeing/smoking Marlboro cigarettes)

           Conditioned Response? (Thinking/feeling tough, macho)

·       Can you think of other advertisements that use classical conditioning to promote their products?                                                             (Analysis)

·       Are newspaper posters the only place where such type of marketing exists? What are some additional examples?                                (Analysis) 

·       How do such advertisements affect the way we behave and develop as individuals?                                                                              (Synthesis)

·       Would such advertising techniques have more affect on young people?

(Evaluation)

·       Do you think that this type of advertisement is fair?           (Evaluation)

 

6.     

Remind students that in their culminating activity they will need to lead their presentation with interview questions.  This segment of the class will teach them what types of questions exist.  Explain to students the difference between lower and higher level questioning.

Define to the class what are:

Knowledge, Comprehensive, Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation questions  

 

7.     

Have pairs, analyze the question sequence on the “Marlboro Man”, categorizing them into Knowledge, Comprehensive, Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation questions.  While class is working, provide individual feedback to groups.

 

 

8.     

In a class discussion ask for student feedback with regards to the categorizing of question sequence.  Point to the students that the question sequence began with lower level questions and advanced to higher level questions, to facilitate understanding and a logical progression.  This technique should be imitated in the presentation.

 

Homework:  have students categorize questions for homework

 

Resources

 

1.                Classical Conditioning and Pavlov

For a thorough explanation of the theory of Classical Conditioning and Pavlov’s ‘salivating dogs’ experiment please see:  http://www.as.wvu.edu/~sbb/comm221/chapters/pavlov.htm)

 

2.      Classical Conditioning case study:

(Taken from: Wayne, W. (2001). Psychology :Themes and Variations. Stamford: Wadsworth Thomson Learning.)

 

The kids in the neighbourhood where I grew up used to dig tunnels in a neighbour’s backyard.  One day a boy got stuck in the tunnel and couldn’t get out.  Eventually he got out, but after that he didn’t want to play in tunnels again.  To this day that person still has an intense fear not only of tunnels but of close in spaces in general.  Label the parts of the classical conditioning process involved in the acquisition of the phobia of closed in spaces.

a.     Getting stuck

b.     Fear produced by getting stuck

c.     Tunnels and closed-in spaces

d.     Fear of tunnels and closed-in spaces

 

 

 

 

 

 Modifications/Accommodations

1.  Use picture diagrams and a real bell to better illustrate Pavlov’s experiment to the visual and    audio learner.

2.  If you find that the “Marlboro Man” overhead is not visually clear when used in class, provide a hard copy to students

 

Assessment/Evaluation

1.                Feedback from students during class discussion and group work.

2.                Providing individual feedback to students during group work.

3.                Homework (will be given at the end of class)

 

 

Lesson Seven: Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Time: 60 minutes or one period

Learning Expectation: Enduring understanding# 2

 

Specific Expectations:

·       Understand the difference between biological and social motivation

·       Understand Abrham Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs Theory

 

Instructional Strategies

Students will be introduces to the Hierarchy of Needs Theory through and engagement activity aimed at helping students understand their own biological and social motivations.  Through a cooperative learning setting, students will learn to classify the activities according to Maslow’s theory.  Shortly after, the teacher will engage class in a socratic discussion on the theory and will provide a definition of self-actualization for the class via overhead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.    In order to understand Maslow’s theory of needs, student need to understand the difference   between biological and social motivation.  Introduce the concept of biological and social needs by asking students questions with regards to their physiological activities.  Students who reply with ‘yes’, will be rewarded with a paper card with an “A+” written on it.

  Questions: ‘who slept more than 7 hours last night?’

               ‘ Who had breakfast this morning?’

   Ask students what is the difference between being motivated to go to sleep/eat breakfast and receiving an “A+”.

         

2.

Define Biological motivation and Social motivation. Write the definition on the overhead.

 

3.       

Divide the class into groups of 4.  Hand out the list of “human activities” worksheet , and ask students to classify the activities according to: biological motivators, social motivators and mixed motivators. While class is working, provide individual feedback to groups.

 

4.       

Take up activity list on the board.  Each group will classify 2-3 activities, justifying their choice to the class.

 

5.     

Ask students what type of needs they think are most important, biological or social?

 

 

 

 

6.     

Introduce Abraham Maslow’s hierarchy of needs theory  Explain that the list of needs is organized in a pyramid because it assumes that basic needs must be met before higher needs will be stimulated.  Define ‘self actualization’ on overhead.

 

7.     

Have students pair up with a partner.  Hand them a list of behaviours and ask them to identify which of Maslow’s needs are being met . While class is working, provide individual feedback to groups.

 

8.     

Take up list with the class. 

 

 

 

 

3.      “Marlboro Man” 

 

am17.jpg (62994 bytes)

 

Figure 2: Marlboro Advertisement

 

4.  Question Types

I. Knowledge: remembering of previously learned material; recall (facts or whole theories); bringing to mind.

- Terms: defines, describes, identifies, lists, matches, names.

 

II. Comprehension: grasping the meaning of material; interpreting (explaining or summarizing); predicting outcome and effects (estimating future trends).

- Terms: convert, defend, distinguish, estimate, explain, generalize, rewrite.

 

III. Application: ability to use learned material in a new situation; apply rules, laws, methods, theories.

- Terms: changes, computes, demonstrates, operates, shows, uses, solves.

 

IV. Analysis: breaking down into parts; understanding organization, clarifying, concluding.

- Indentify parts; See related Order; Relationships; Clarify.

- Terms: distinguish, diagrams, outlines, relates, breaks down, discriminates, subdivides.

 

V. Synthesis: ability to put parts together to form a new whole; unique communication; set of abstract relations.

- Terms: combines, compliles, composes, creates, designs, rearranges.

 

VI. Evaluation: ability to judge value for purpose; base on criteria; support judgment with reason. (No guessing).

- Terms: appraises, criticizes, compares, supports, concludes, discriminates, contrasts, summarizes, explain.

 

5.  Homework

 

Categorize the following questions into Knowledge, Comprehensive, Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation questions.

a.     In what year did Pavlov do his experiments? (Knowledge)

b.     How do you think Pavlov’s theory can be used in everyday life? (Comprehension)

c.     Based on what you see in television, do you think that advertisement agencies have the viewer’s benefit in mind?

(Evaluation).

d.     Look at the following graph, what do you predict would be the readership of the ‘Toronto Star’ in 2004?  (Analysis)

e.     What classical conditioning techniques did the advertisement author use?  (Analysis)

f.      Create an advertisement that will have viewers sweat every time the see a glass of Coca-Cola. (Synthesis).

g.     Using the information learned in class, classify the following questions according to high/low level questions. (Application)

 

Resources

1.                  50 paper cards with “A+” written on them

2.                                           “Human Activities” worksheet. (see appendix).

3.                                           Abraham Maslow Hierarchy of Needs Theory (see appendix)

4.                                          “Hierarchy of Needs” worksheet (see appendix – not available on disc)

Abraham Maslow Hierarchy of Needs Theory

     For a thorough explanation of the theory and a diagram visualizing the ‘Needs Pyramid’

     please see http://www.accel-team.com/human_relations/hrels_02_maslow.html

 

 

Accommodations/Modifications

1.  If preparation time is limited, give students “chocolate kisses” instead of  A+” paper squares.  This will motivate students both socially and biologically, ‘driving the message home’.

 

Assessment/Evaluation

1.    Feedback from students during class discussion and group work.

2.    Providing individual feedback to students during group work.

3.    Homework (homework is given and will be referred to in the next class).

 

 

 

“Human Activities” worksheet.

Classify the following activities into three columns:

I) Biological motivators,  II) Social motivators,  III) Mixed column

 

 

Playing Soccer

 

 

Eating Lunch

 

 

Studying French

 

 

Taking an Afternoon Nap

 

 

Screaming When You Go Down a Roller Coaster

 

 

Drinking a Cold Glass of Coca–Cola on a Hot Summer Day

 

Completing Your Homework for Our Class

 

 

Going to Movies with Friends

 

 

Respecting Your Parents

 

 

Looking for a Part Time Job

 

 

Moving into a Bigger House

 

Joining an Art Class

 

Wearing a Warm Coat on Cool Night

 

Asking a Boy/Girl On  A  Date

 

 

 

Lesson Eight: Sigmund Freud, Karen Horney and Personality Theories

Time: 60 minutes or one period

Learning Expectations: Enduring understanding #2

 

Specific Expectations:

·       Identify and assess the major influences that contribute to an individual’s personal and social development (environment, gender).

·       Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others made by at least one of the leading practitioners in each of psychology (Freud and Horney)

·       Demonstrate an understanding of the major questions related to “self and others” that are posed by psychologists (e.g. How do defence mechanisms enable use to cope with others?).

 

Instructional Strategies

Students will be introduced the Sigmund Freud’s theory of the mind and Karen Horney’s personality theory through a socratic lesson and a paired activity that requires students to demonstrate thinking/inquiry skills as they will connect this unit with the unit on gender roles and the media.

 

1.

  Review with students brainstorming rules.

  Ask students to pair up with a partner.  On a page divided in two they are to brainstorm how Sigmund Freud’s and Karen Horney’s the same and how were they different.

 

 

 

 

 

2.

Ask students to share their responses with the class.

Introduce the concept of Freud’s Id, Ego and Superego on the overhead.  Stress the conflicts that occur between the three levels of the mind.

 

3.

 

Illustrate to the class how Freud’s theory would explain the behaviour of a students who has received a detention from a teacher for cheating on a test.

i.e. how would the id, ego, superego react.

 

             Id:                     I hate this teacher! I want to scream at him/her. (Basic Drive)

              Superego:        You shouldn’t scream at the teacher. You are the one who cheated. It is                     not his/her fault.

              Ego:                You should calm down.  If you get too angry she will call your parents       and than you will really be in trouble.

4.     

Ask students what type of needs they think are most important, biological or social?

 

 

 

5.     

Introduce to the students Freud’s theory of defence mechanisms

Analyze the first case with the class.  Ask students to analyze cases 2,3,4 with their

‘brain-storming’ pair.

While class is working, provide individual feedback to groups.

 

6.               

Take up student answers.

 

7.

Introduce Karen Horney by asking students to refer back to their brainstorming notes to suggest where does Horney agree and where does she differs with Freud’s personality theory.

 

8.

Illustrate to the students Horney’s rejection of Freud’s chauvinistic theory of personality development.  Explain to class Freud’s theory of Penis Envy (see appendix). 

Ask students: how could men feel threatened by women? 

                    What can women physically do that men will never be able to do?

 

Explain to students that Horney was a feminist psychologist that believed that women were only envious of men’s social power. 

          Remind students of the lesson on Gender Roles and the Media, pointing to their work would should still be hanging on the wall.

 

9.     

          Summarize the content of the lesson.

          Remind students that tomorrow’s class will be a work period    so that they should bring all the work they did up to date.    

 

Resources

 

Sigmund Freud’s theory of the mind

     For a thorough explanation of Freud’s three levels of the mind, defence mechanisms, and personality development please see http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/freud.html

 

 

  Karen Horney’s personality theory

     For an explanation of Karen Horney’s personality theory please see      http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/horney.html H 

 

 

 

 

Accommodations/Modifications

To many students Freud’s theory of Id, Ego and Superego is too abstract.  To make it more  concrete, have a doll in the class.  Point to its heart when explaining the Ego.   Point to its head(brain) when explaining the Superego. Point to its mouth when explaining the Id.

 

 

Assessment/Evaluation

Feedback from students during class discussion and group work.

Providing individual feedback to students during group work.

Homework

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Culminating Activity – Socialization and Adolescent Behaviour

 

 

A. Expectations

 

Self and Others

·        Identify primary and secondary agents of socialization and evaluate their influence.

·        Identify and assess the major influences that contribute to an individual’s personal and social development

·        Evaluate the major contributions to our understanding of the idea of self in relation to others made by at least one of the leading practitioners in each of psychology (e.g., Sigmund Freud, Karen Horney etc.)

·        Demonstrate an understanding of the major questions related to “self and others” that are posed by psychologists (e.g., How do defence mechanisms enable us to cope with others?)

 

Research and Inquiry

 

·        Demonstrate an ability to locate and select relevant information from a variety of print and electronic sources (e.g., books, Internet sites).

·        Evaluate the validity of information gathered through research.

·        Use correct forms of citation (e.g., those recommended by the American Psychological Association).

·        Formulate appropriate questions for research, inquiry, and interviews relating to one or more of the main areas of concern in the social sciences.

·        Effectively communicate the results of their inquiries, using a variety of methods and forms (e.g. oral presentations, visual presentation of data, written reports).

 

 

The culminating activity will be introduced to the students at the end of the introductory lesson so that students will have ample time to start preliminary research and choose topics. 

Lesson content will provide the class with knowledge and skills necessary for the successful completion of the culminating performance in the following order:

 

 

Lesson

 

Introduction

(lesson 1)

·        Introduce culminating activity.  Go over handout, and rubrics.

Piaget and Cognitive Development

(lesson 4)

·        Students will pick their topic and group.

Library

(lesson 5)

·        Students will learn to research library catalogue and internet. 

·        By the end of the class they are to find a book and web site on their topic.

Gender Roles and Media

(lesson 6)

·        Students will learn how to present visuals in an effective way

Classical Conditioning

(lesson 7)

·        Students will learn to recognize low and high order questioning.  This is necessary for the formation of questioning during interview presentation

Culture and Religion

(lesson 8 and 9)

·        Students will learn oral presentation and communication skills. 

·        Students will be required to show outline of their oral + written report.

 

This table will be shown to the class during the introductory lesson. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       

 

 

Culminating Activity – Socialization and Adolescent Behaviour

 

The purpose of this assignment is for you to investigate how socialization agents affect adolescent behaviour.  The assignment is composed of a presentation to be completed in a group of four and an individual written report. 

 

1. Presentation          = 50 marks                               

2.  Individual Report = 30 marks

 

Total Mark           =80

Due date:

Note:  you will be required to show an outline of your written report on:

 

A. Oral Presentation – An Investigative Television Show

In groups of three, you will prepare a 12-15 minute presentation in the form of an investigative television show.  The show will feature a Media Anchor, an Adolescent ‘expert’ and two Psychology Theorists.  Please see attached rubrics for breakdown of marks. 

 

I. The roles of the characters are as follows:

* Group Member 1, Media Anchor   will:

 

1.       Present general background on the chosen socialization agent. 

Briefly describe its importance in shaping human behaviour (e.g. what effect does it have on various populations? Different age groups? Gender roles?)

2.       Interview the Adolescent ‘Expert’, so that they will provide the viewers with the following information:

·         His/her brief biography

·         The effect the socialization agent has on the adolescent’s thoughts and behaviours (neutral, positive and negative).

3.       Interview the Psychology Theorists in sequence, so that they will provide the viewers with the following information:

·         His/her brief biography

·         Why the chosen socialization agent has a negative affect on adolescents

·         What adolescents can do to avoid the above negative affects

 

 

 

 

 

* Group Member 2, Adolescent ‘Expert’ will:

1.                      Respond to interview questions posed by the Media Anchor and Psychology Theorists:

·            Describe to the media anchor how the socialization agent affects your own thoughts, values and behaviours and those of your peers (neutral, positive and negative affects).

·            Use visuals (data charts/graphs, pictures or video clips etc…) or audio (music, interview from the ‘field’) to strengthen your argument. If a T.V or any other equipment needs to be booked, please inform the teacher at least three days in advance.

 

 

* Group Member 3 and 4, Psychology Theorists

1.    Present the media anchor and audience your biography and a brief description of your theory.

2.    Based on your theories and questions that you will pose to the Adolescent ‘Expert’, explain to the Media Anchor, Adolescent ‘Expert’ and viewers  why the chosen agent of socialization is having an effect on adolescent behaviour.  

3.   Suggest an approach that adolescents can take to avoid the negative aspects of the chosen socialization agent.

 

II. Themes and Theorists

Each group will choose one agent of socialization and one psychology theorist from the list below. If your choice does not appear on this list please have it approved by your teacher.

 

Agent of Socialization

Psychology Theorists

Family

Erik Eriksson

Peers

Jean Piaget

Schools

Sigmund Freud

Work

Abraham Maslow

Media

Carol Gilligan

Culture

Karen Horney

Religion

Ivan Pavlov

 

Burrhus Fredric Skinner

 

William Glasser

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Content Presentation Checklist

 

 



General description of social agent in shaping human behaviour

 



Adolescent biography

 

 

    

The neutral, positive and negative effects the social agent has on the adolescent behaviour

 

  

A  B

Psychologist A and Psychologist B biography

  

A  B

Brief description of Psychologist’s A and Psychologist’s B theory

 

  

A  B

Psychologist’s A and Psychologist’s B explanation as to why adolescents’ behaviour is effected by the social agent

 

 

  

A  B

Proposal as to how adolescents can avoid the negative effects of the social agent by Psychologist A and Psychologist

 

 

 

 

Presentation Rubric

 

Thinking/

Inquiry

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

    Level 4

Content and topic research

 

/18

Information presented in role shows limited understanding of the topic and very little research.

 

Information presented in role shows some understanding of the topic and moderate research conducted.

 

 

Information presented in role shows a good understanding of the topic and evidence of research conducted. 

 

Information presented in role shows a thorough understanding of the topic and extensive research.

 

Communication

       Level 1

      Level 2

     Level 3

      Level 4

Acting and evidence of practice

 

/6

Clarity of speech, tone, pace and volume is poor (inaudible). No eye contact, totally reading from notes.

Clarity of speech, tone, pace and volume is fair (audible). Some eye contact, often reading from notes.

Clarity of speech, tone, pace and volume is good.

Good eye contact, moderate reading from notes.

Clarity of speech, tone, pace and volume is excellent.

Constant eye contact, minimal reading from notes.

Dramatic (realistic) portrayal of role and professionalism

 

/6

Poor posture and poor use of gestures. Irresponsible participation.

Adequate posture and use of appropriate gestures. Responsible participation.

Good posture and use of appropriate gestures. Responsible participation.

Excellent posture and use of appropriate gestures. Responsible participation.

Visual Aids

 

/8

Very few or no visual aids, lack detail. Uses aids with minimal effectiveness for presentation.

Some visual aids used with adequate detail. Uses aids with some effectiveness for presentation

Uses fairly detailed visual aids effectively to aid presentation.

Uses detailed visual aids highly effectively to enhance presentation.

Application

       Level 1

      Level 2

     Level 3

      Level 4

Connection to  individual role (theory presented)

 

/12

Ideas are not developed and limited explanation provided.

Ideas are somewhat developed and explained in some depth.

Ideas are well developed explained in depth.

Ideas fully developed and explained in great detail (show insight).

 

Comments:

 

 

 

 

B. Written Report

 

The written report is to be completed individually. 

Each group member is to write a 350-400 word report.

 

 

In this report you are to choose one of the psychology theorists from your oral presentation.   Take a personal stand and explain why the theorist provides a compelling argument showing why a certain socialization agent affects human behaviour.  Be sure to demonstrate how and why this agent impacts adolescents.

(You must discuss the socialization agent represented in the group presentation).

 

 

Remember to include brief introduction and conclusion along with supporting information.  You are encouraged to include personal experiences to illustrate your point.

 

 

A minimum of three references must be used (2 books and 1 internet source). A bibliography using APA referencing must accompany the paper.

 

 

Written Report Rubric

 

 

Thinking and Inquiry

 

 

Level 1

 

Level 2

 

Level 3

 

Level 4

 

Analysis and supporting information

 

/8

 

Attempt at analysis made, evidence of minor thoughtfulness, attempt made to support opinion.

 

 

Satisfactory analysis, evidence of some thoughtfulness, opinion supported with information.

Good analysis, evidence of thoughtfulness, opinion supported with good information.

Outstanding analysis, evidence of thorough thoughtfulness, opinion supported with excellent information.

Application

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

 

Application of personal experiences

 

/7

Report includes no supporting examples 

Report includes some supporting examples 

Report includes supporting examples

Report includes insightful supporting examples.

Knowledge

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

 

Use of information and research

 

/7

Information in report reflects minimal research

Information in report reflects good research and applied satisfactorily

Information in report reflects thorough research and is applied successfully

Information in report reflects extensive research and is applied highly successfully

Communica-tion

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

 

Grammar, spelling, and organization

 

 

/5

Grammar and spelling mistakes are frequent.  Minimal effort at organization. Clarity and flow impede understanding.

Some grammar and spelling mistakes. Some organizational thought evident. Report is clear and flows.

Very few grammar and spelling mistakes. Good organizational thought evident. High degree of clarity and flow.

Grammar and spelling are almost perfect. High degree of organizational thought evident. Exceptional clarity and flow.

Correct Referencing (APA style) 

 

/3

Incorrect APA  referencing

1 reference used

Some errors using APA  referencing

2 references used

Slight errors in APA  referencing

3 references used

 

Correct APA  referencing

3 references used

 

Comments:

 

 

 

 

 

 

           

 

September 2005

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

 

 

 

 

1

2

3

4

5

6

Back to School!

7

Lesson One – Agents Of Socialization

 

Self Test/ Group Discussion

 

8

9

Lesson Two – Nature vs. Nurture

 

Brainstorming Chart

 

10

11

12

Lesson Two – Nature vs. Nurture

 

Video/ Questions

Group Discussion

 

 

13

14

Lesson Three – Jean Piaget

 

Quiz

Jigsaw/ Discussion

15

16 

Lesson Four – Gender

Roles In the Media

 

Student Conference

 

17

18

19

Lesson Four-Classical

Conditioning & the Media

Student Conferences

Group Discussion

 

20

21

Lesson Five – Abraham Maslow

 

Student Conferencing

22

23

Lesson Six- William

Glasser

Case Studies

Partner Discussions

Student Conferencing

24

25

26

Lesson Seven – Freud/Karen Horney

Case Studies

Time to work on Culminating Task

27

28

Culminating Task

Time to work on Group Presentations/ Individual paper

29

30

Culminating Task

Time to work on Group Presentation/Individual Paper

The First week of October would be the culminating  presentations (the individual papers would be due).

 


 

Appendix

 

1.  Sigmund Freud’s theory of the mind

     For a thorough explanation of Freud’s three levels of the mind, defence mechanisms, and personality development please see http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/freud.html

 

 

1.  Karen Horney’s personality theory

     For an explanation of Karen Horney’s personality theory please see      http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/horney.html

 

 

1.      Introduction to Socialization

 

Books

 

Jarman, Frederick et al. The Living Family, A Canadian Perspective. Toronto: John Wiley and Sons, 1991. This book provides very detailed information on primary and secondary agents of socialization.

 

Sproute, Wayne.  Our Social World: An introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, & Sociology.  Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2001.  Contains a personality self test and a good definition of socialization.

 

 

2 & 3. Nature vs. Nurture

 

Books:

 

Hawkes, Charles et. al.  Images of Society: Introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, and Sociology.  Toronto: McGraw-Hill, 2001. Contains twin case studies and useful terms on the nature nurture debate.

 

Sproute, Wayne.  Our Social World: An introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, & Sociology.  Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2001.  Contains information on nature and nurture from a socialization perspective.

 

Video:

 

 “Secret of the Wild Child”. Video by Nova Series. (1994) 60 minutes. This video illustrates the nature vs. nurture debate by discussing the Genie case: a thirteen-year-old girl raised in isolation. Evidence of a critical period for learning language is also discussed.

 

 

4. Jean Piaget and Cognitive Development

 

Web-sites

 Wwwed.sturt.flinders.edu.au/dlt/2000/piaget/stages.htm

This web site contains clear and concise explanations for Piaget’s stages of cognitive development

 

5. Library Orientation and Research Skills

    Books:

    1. Strichart, S.S. (1997) Teaching study skills and strategies in high school.

            Toronto : Allyn and Bacon.  -  This book contains notes and worksheets that teachers can use when instructing study skills to students. Topics include: note taking, library/internet  research, test writing and time management.

     Web-sites

    1. http://www.ithaca.edu/library/course/apa.html - A web site containing information and      examples on how to reference books and internet sites using the APA style.

             

     2.  http://www.noodletools.com/debbie/literacies/information/5locate/adviceengine.html -                      A TDSB web site that contains a long list of search engines that are need specific        (i.e. images, maps, statistical data, government information etc…)

    

    3.  www.google.com - An all purpose search engine.

 

     4. www.nlc-bnc.ca/caninfo/ecaninfo.htm - A research engine about Canada managed by the     National Library of Canada

 

6. Gender Roles and the Media

    Newspapers:

    1. Metro 2. Toronto-Star  3. Globe and Mail  4. National Post  - All are daily newspapers representing the center, center, center/right and right points of view of the Canadian political spectrum.

 

7. Classical Conditioning and the Media

     Books:

       1.  Wayne, W. (2001). Psychology :Themes and Variations. Stamford: Wadsworth Thomson Learning. - A university introductory psychology textbook, surveying a range of psychology content.  The book contains useful exercises for student learning.

 

      Web-sites  

       1. http://www.as.wvu.edu/~sbb/comm221/chapters/pavlov.htm - A web site containing                                                                         a thorough good explanation of what is classical conditioning, why it works, and                 how Pavlov discovered it. 

 

8. Classical Conditioning and the Media

     Web site :

     1. http://www.accel-team.com/human_relations/hrels_02_maslow.html - A web site containing a thorough explanation of Maslow’s theory of the hierarchy of needs, and a diagram visualizing the ‘Needs Pyramid’.

 

9. William Glasser Theory of Needs and ‘Total Behaviour’.

     Web site :

  1. http://www.angelfire.com/ab/brightminds/tNeeds.html - A web site explaining Glasser’s  theory of needs and its effects on ‘total behaviour’. Contains case examples.

 

10&11. Culture and Religion.

 

Books:

Sproute, Wayne.  Our Social World: An introduction to Anthropology, Psychology, & Sociology.  Toronto: Prentice Hall, 2001. Teachers Resource Guide. The text contains a variety of information on culture and cultural adaptation. The resource guide includes interesting activities and charts that can be used in the classroom

 

 

 

 

Web Site:

Wwwed.sturt.flinders.edu.au/dlt/2000/piaget/stages.htm. This web site contains clear and concise information on Piaget’s four stages of cognitive development.

 

 

12. Sigmund Freud, Karen Horney and Personality Theories

     Web site :

     1.  http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/freud.html - A web site explaining Sigmund Freud’s theory of the mind: Id, Ego, Superego, defense mechanisms, and personality development. The site also contains Freud’s biography.

    2.  http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/horney.html- A web site explaining Karen Horney’s personality theory and neurosis theory.. The site also contains Karen Horney’s biography.

 

 


 

Statement of Design Process

 

 

 

Designing a unit using the “Design Down” model has many benefits that we certainly experienced during this course.   Knowing where the end will be before the journey begins allows the teacher an opportunity to strategically plan each element of a unit.   As a group we also discovered that once you plan a unit this way, it is yours to redevelop and refine as long as you teach the course.   It is a new way of approaching a unit, and all staff members in a school must be provided with PD opportunities to learn how to implement this design process in their own classrooms.   Once this catches on in a school, it allows for open sharing of resources and units.   As a group we found it initially challenging to develop our unit, however once we started working on what the end would look like (culminating task), everything else came together.   Design down is a great tool that we all are now able to take away from this course and pass along to our colleagues (this is a great leadership opportunity for all of us!).